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Vol. 8, Issue 6 (2019)

Suppression of sucking insects in bhendi after spraying imidacloprid and milk-made lactic acid bacterial formulation

Author(s):
Elakkiya K, P Yasodha, CGL Justin, J Ejilane, S Somasundaram and PMM David
Abstract:
To manage sucking pests, imidacloprid is commonly sprayed on vegetable crops despite ecological implications, especially residues and declining bee colonies. With epiphytic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) degrading pesticide residues, spraying milk-made LAB formulations on crops is likely to reduce these risks as a bio-ameliorant. In this study, a milk-made colloidal formulation rich in sugar-tolerant LAB, referred to as Milkoid, was evaluated in bhendi in screen house and field, following imidacloprid spray, in comparison with the antimicrobial bleaching powder (calcium hypochlorite) against early sucking pests, namely, leafhopper Amrasca biguttula biguttula, whitefly Bemisia tabaci and aphid Aphis gossypii. The results indicated that the epiphytic LAB density on bhendi leaves was significantly higher on plants after spraying imidacloprid 17.8 SL at 0.02 ml / l and Milkoid at 2.0 % in tandem, followed by imidacloprid-treated and control plants, than on plants sprayed with bleaching powder 1.0 %, with or without imidacloprid. Whitefly-transmitted yellow mosaic viral infection, aphid and leafhopper infestations were significantly less on plants sprayed with imidacloprid with or without bleaching powder than on other plants with or without any sprays, including Milkoid, bleaching powder, and imidacloprid / Milkoid. The efficacy of Milkoid LAB in reducing the toxicity of imidacloprid and the potential of calcium hypochlorite as an antimicrobial agent in crop protection are discussed.
Pages: 592-598  |  305 Views  116 Downloads


The Pharma Innovation Journal
How to cite this article:
Elakkiya K, P Yasodha, CGL Justin, J Ejilane, S Somasundaram, PMM David. Suppression of sucking insects in bhendi after spraying imidacloprid and milk-made lactic acid bacterial formulation. Pharma Innovation 2019;8(6):592-598.

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